The moral theory of utilitarianism (the idea that rightness and wrongness is determined solely by the consequences for good and bad) has a number of classic objections. In his seminal essay, 'Two Concepts of Rules', John Rawls defends utilitarianism against the objection that utilitarianism allows immoral acts, such as framing an innocent person and breaking a promise.
At the next Philosophy Matters Meetup we’ll be exploring what world-renowned singer and songwriter Beth Neilsen Chapman means by a ‘system for love’. We’ll be discussing the philosophical implications of her message for how we manage our personal relations and structure our societies.
(On Zoom) Reading Group: History of Philosophy of Science (Ch. 19: Descriptivism) In this series, we are working through John Losee’s book, ‘A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Science‘, one bite at a time. Your facilitator, Les Allan, will begin each session with a summary of the section under consideration and then move into […]
(On Zoom) Reading Group: History of Philosophy of Science (Ch. 18: Realism) In this series, we are working through John Losee’s book, ‘A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Science‘, one bite at a time. Your facilitator, Les Allan, will begin each session with a summary of the section under consideration and then move into a […]
(On Zoom) Reading Group: History of Philosophy of Science (Ch. 17: The Justification of Evaluative Standards) In this series, we are working through John Losee’s book, ‘A Historical Introduction to the Philosophy of Science‘, one bite at a time. Your facilitator, Les Allan, will begin each session with a summary of the section under consideration […]